retrieverDon’t forget!  All Cornell law students, faculty, and staff are invited to enjoy pet therapy in the Saperston Student Lounge on Tuesday, April 30.  Two dogs and a llama will be available from 11am-1pm for relaxing companionship.  No sign-up required; drop by anytime.  Spouses, partners, and children are welcome.

llama-webThis program is co-sponsored by the Cornell Law Library, Cornell Companions (a pet visitation program sponsored by the Cornell University veterinary community), and the Cornell Student Animal Legal Defense Fund, who will provide refreshments.

Notice to Non-Law Students

Effective Saturday, April 27 through Friday, May 10, use of the Law Library is limited to Law School students, faculty, and staff during the exam period.  Non-law students may access the Law Library to conduct legal research, consult with a reference librarian, and retrieve books.  All Law Library carrels are reserved for Law Students at all times.

See here for a list of alternative places to study on campus:  http://www.library.cornell.edu/libraryhours

 

Thank you.

Cornell Law students

As the semester draws to a close, we recommend scheduling a customized research consultation with a librarian to prepare for summer employment.  Tailored advice includes, but is not limited to, specific jurisdictional sources, key resources in substantive practice areas, and advanced research skills and strategies. Consultations can be as short as 15 minutes or last up to 60 minutes. Our registration form allows you to specify your interests and needs, and request a particular Research Services Librarian if desired. Forms are available at the Circulation Desk in the Reading Room.

llama-clipAll Cornell law students, faculty, and staff are invited to enjoy pet therapy in the Saperston Student Lounge on Tuesday, April 30.  Two dogs and a llama will be available from 11am-1pm for relaxing companionship.  No sign-up required; drop by anytime.  Spouses, partners, and children are welcome.

This program is co-sponsored by the Cornell Law Library, Cornell Companions (a pet visitation program sponsored by the Cornell University veterinary community), and the Cornell Student Animal Legal Defense Fund, who will provide refreshments.

Attention Cornell Law Students:

Are you interested in sharing your opinion about study space in the library?

Consider taking a break next week to enjoy some pizza and weigh in on library space and services.  The library will be hosting a student focus group on Thursday, April 25, 12:30-1:30pm in room 389.  The group is open to the first twenty Cornell Law students who sign up here:

https://cornell.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_7PwbHGtlfffiyEt

We hope you can join us!

Reading Room_2The Law Library invites Cornell Law 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs to submit scholarly research papers to be considered for the annual Cornell Law Library Prize for Exemplary Student Research.

Entries may include, but are not limited to, papers written for a class or journal notes.  All papers must have been written in the time period spanning May, 2012 – May, 2013.  Work product generated through summer or other employment will not be accepted.  Papers must be a minimum of 10 pages in length, must be written in proper Bluebook format, and must be properly footnoted.

First prize is $500, second prize is $250, and both winners will be invited to publish their papers in Scholarship@Cornell Law, our digital repository.  For submission procedure and selection criteria, please see Prize for Exemplary Student Research.

Papers will be accepted on an ongoing basis through May 1, 2013.  The winners will be announced May 8, 2013.

In honor of National Library Week, the Law Library is pleased to announce an amnesty for law library fines.  Return overdue Law Library books to the Circulation Desk before 5pm on Friday, April 19, to receive forgiveness for any fines owed, no questions asked.

Please note the following:

  • Amnesty applies only to Law Library books. We cannot waive fines for other libraries.
  • Fines that have already posted to your bursar account are not subject to forgiveness under this program.
  • Only overdue/late fines will be cleared, not charges associated with lost, damaged, or otherwise missing items. However, if you still have an item for which you have been billed, bring it back to the library and all charges will be waived.
  • Fines that have been paid in the past are not subject to refund.

Contact Amy Emerson at aae25@cornell.edu with questions.

Print and complete the form LawLibraryBookReturn and submit it with your library materials (if applicable) at the circulation desk.

Just posted in Scholarship@Cornell Law is “Unborn Communities,” a working paper by Gregory S. Alexander, A. Robert Noll Professor of Law at Cornell. From the abstract:

Do property owners owe obligations to members of future generations? Although the question can be reframed in rights-terms so that it faces rights-oriented theories of property, it seems to pose a greater challenge to those theories of property that directly focus on the obligations that property owners owe to others rather than (or, better, along with) the rights of owner. The challenge is compounded where such theories emphasize the relationships between individual property owners and the various communities to which they belong. Do those communities include members of future generations? This paper addresses these questions as they apply to a property theory that I have developed in recent work, a theory that we can call the human-flourishing theory of property.

If you’re not familiar with Scholarship@Cornell Law, it’s Cornell Law Library’s digital repository of 1,000 scholarly articles, papers, and presentations, all available online, for free.  Scholarship@Cornell Law is part of bePress’s Law Commons, where Cornell Law Library has one of the top five most popular repositories.

While both published and working papers by Cornell law faculty make up the bulk of Scholarship@Cornell Law, we also have papers by students, including winners of the Cornell Law Library Prize for Exemplary Student ResearchPapers from many different law school centers and programs, the Avon Global Center for Women and Justice and Dorothea S. Clarke Program in Feminist Jurisprudence and the Cornell e-Rulemaking Initiative are also found at Scholarship@Cornell Law.

A couple of months ago, we featured here a guide for law clerks and externs.  Now, we have another title that should help law clerks and externs greatly: the third edition of Judge Ruggero Aldisert’s Opinion Writing.  Judge Aldisert is Chief Judge Emeritus and Senior U.S. Circuit Judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit.  His handbook includes discussions of, among other things, the process of reaching and justifying a decision, the different sections of an opinion, and writing style, and offers checklists for both appellate opinions and trial court opinions.  He offers suggestions for using the book by experienced and new judges and law clerks.  For the latter, he says: “This book is for you.  Start reading this book your very first day on the job” (p. xxx).

Opinion Writing is available on two-hour reserve at the Law Library’s circulation desk.

For a slightly different audience is Cracking the Case Method: Legal Analysis for Law School Success, by Paul Bergman, Patrick Goodman, and Thomas Holm, all of UCLA.  Professor Bergman and his colleagues explain the process of legal analysis — that is, the “process of distilling discrete legal issues from stories and developing arguments to support the resolution of those legal issues” (p. xi) — for beginning law students.  They include a discussion of final exam strategies.

Cracking the Case Method is available for check-out at the Law Library.

 

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