amnesty2

Return overdue Law Library books to the Circulation Desk before 5pm on Friday, April 18, to receive forgiveness for any fines owed, no questions asked.

Please note the following:

  • Amnesty applies only to Law Library books. We cannot waive fines for other libraries.
  • Fines that have already posted to your bursar account are not subject to forgiveness under this program.
  • Only overdue/late fines will be cleared, not charges associated with lost, damaged, or otherwise missing items. However, if you still have an item for which you have been billed, bring it back to the library and all charges will be waived.
  • Fines that have been paid in the past are not subject to refund.

Contact Mark Williams (mjw332@cornell.edu) with questions.

Print and complete the form LawLibraryBookReturn and submit it with your library materials (if applicable) at the circulation desk.

 

With retired Justice John Paul Stevens stevensin the news recently it seemed to appropriate to highlight his Green Bag Bobblehead, currently on display in the Gould Reading Room.

Stevens was the second justice to be bestowed with a bobblehead in 2004. As with all of the representations, the figurine features several unique traits commemorating his personality and jurisprudence. A detailed explanation of all of the features for Justice Stevens can be found here. 

Two of the more notable features include Stevens holding a golf club to represent his majority opinion in PGA Tour, Inc. v. Martin, 532 U.S. 661 (2001) and he also stands on a Betamax video player to represent his opinion in Sony Corp. v. Universal City Studios, 464 U.S. 417 (1984), which included a detailed discussion of the famed children’s television program Mister Rogers Neighborhood.

Check back over the next few weeks as we’ll be taking a closer look at some of the other bobbleheads on display in the Reading Room.

HOLlogo_fullcolorJust in time to catch the end of Women’s History Month we’re unveiling our latest database from HeinOnline: Women and the Law (Peggy). From the publisher:

“This unique collection of materials provides a platform to research the progression of women’s roles and rights in society over the past 200 years.  Also included are more than 70 titles from Emory University Law School’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project, which provide a platform to view the effect of law and culture on the female gender.”

For more information on what’s included in the collection check the brochure provided in the link above or contact Nina Scholtz (nes78@cornell.edu), Digital Resources Librarian.

DSCN2465If you’re wondering why we have a bunch of bobbleheads displayed in the Reading Room take a closer look.

These aren’t just random figurines collected from minor league baseball games, they’re unique (and rare) representations of Supreme Court Justices.

The creation of Professor Ross Davies of George Mason Law and Editor in Chief of The Green Bag: An Entertaining Journal of Law, the bobbleheads have become well known for their light-hearted representations of the personalities and passions of the members of the Supreme Court.

Featured by CBS News, CNN, The New York Times and Politico among others, Law Library owns one of the largest collections of the bobbleheads and is currently exhibiting them this semester.

Whether its Justice John Paul Stevens sporting a golf club to represent his majority opinion in PGA Tour, Inc. v. Martin, 532 U.S. 661 (2001) or Justice Souter wearing a gold chain to symbolize his role in Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, 510 U.S. 569 (1994) (a.k.a the 2 Live Crew fair use case) all the bobbleheads and the unique stories behind them are currently on display in the Gould Reading Room.

Check back over the next few weeks as we’ll be taking a closer look at some at some of the unique and entertaining features of some of the individual justices.

With the announcement of Eduardo M. Peñalver as the new Allan R. Tessler Dean of Cornell Law School we’re highlighting his scholarship on our repository this week.

Peñalver taught at Cornell from 2006-2012 before moving on to the University of Chicago prior to his upcoming tenure as dean. Many of his publications are already featured on Scholarship@Cornell Law and highlight his work in property and land use, as well as law and religion. The publications can be found, here.

For more on the latest scholarly articles from the law school faculty visit the repository at Scholarship@Cornell Law.

eisenberg_2000As the Cornell Law School mourns the death of Professor Theodore Eisenberg, the Law Library is taking a moment to feature his groundbreaking legal scholarship.

A pioneer in the field of empirical legal studies, the uniqueness of his scholarship was equally matched by his productivity, authoring or coauthoring over 125 scholarly articles and writing or contributing to over 20 books. Additionally he founded the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies in 2004, which is consistently regarded as one of the most influential publications in the field.

Many of Professor Eisenberg’s works are currently featured on our Scholarship@Cornell Law repository, where his use of statistical methodology to gain new insights into punitive damages, capital juries and myriad of other diverse topics is on full display and serves as a tribute to the legacy of one of Cornell Law’s true intellectual and creative forces.

The library has recently acquired the EBSCOhost database Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text. The database features close to 500,000 records from the most influential publications in the discipline, including full text for nearly 300 journals and magazines, according to the publisher.

The database may be used by all Cornell students, faculty, and staff both on and off campus with the link given above.

Questions? Contact Nina Scholtz, Digital Resources Librarian, or Law Library Reference.

Today we’re featuring one of the most recent additions to our repository with Professor Charles K. Whitehead’s January 2014 article “Lawyers and Fools: Lawyer-Directors in Public Corporations” appearing in the Georgetown Law Review and co-authored with Lubomir P. Litov and Simone M. Sepe of the University of Arizona.

From the abstract:

The accepted wisdom—that a lawyer who becomes a corporate director has a fool for a client—is outdated. The benefits of lawyer-directors in today’s world significantly outweigh the costs. Beyond monitoring, they help manage litigation and regulation, as well as structure compensation to align CEO and shareholder interests. The results have been an average 9.5% increase in firm value and an almost doubling in the percentage of public companies with lawyer-directors.

This Article is the first to analyze the rise of lawyer-directors. It makes a variety of other empirical contributions, each of which is statistically significant and large in magnitude. First, it explains why the number of lawyer-directors has increased. Among other reasons, businesses subject to greater litigation and regulation as well as firms with significant intangible assets, such as patents, value a lawyer-director’s expertise. Second, this Article describes the impact of lawyer-directors on corporate monitoring. Among other results, it shows that lawyer-directors are more likely to favor a board structure and takeover defenses that potentially reduce shareholder value—balanced, however, by the benefits of lawyer-directors, such as the valuable advice they can provide. Finally, this Article analyzes the significant reduction in risk-taking and the increase in firm value that results from having a lawyer on the board.

Our findings fly in the face of requirements that focus on director independence. Our results show that board composition—and the training, skills, and experience that directors bring to managing a business—can be at least as valuable to the firm and its shareholders.

For more on the latest scholarly articles from Professor Whitehead and the rest of the law school faculty visit the repository at Scholarship@Cornell Law.

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for February 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Minds, Brains, and Law : The Conceptual Foundations of Law and Neuroscience – Michael S. Pardo; Dennis M. Patterson

minds

Law and Gender – Joanne Conaghan

lawandgender

Framing the Net : The Internet and Human Rights – Rikke Frank Jørgensen

framing

The law library is pleased to announce the launch of a newly redesigned platform for the Donovan Nuremberg Trials Collection website at: http://ebooks.lbrary.cornell.edu/n/nur/

The redesign features an improved interface, increased searchability and browsability, as well as the added ability to browse by witness.

The collection consists of nearly 150 bound volumes of Nuremberg trial transcripts and documents from the personal archives of General William J. Donovan (1883-1959). The Donovan papers contain both original statements from the defendants in German and typed translations in English prepared by the Allies.

nuremberg

 

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