It’s Banned Books Week, an annual event bringing together the entire book community to celebrate the freedom to read. BBW14_Profile_op3

According to the American Library Association 307 separate titles were challenged in the United States last year alone.

To celebrate we’ve put up an exhibit in the reading room featuring some of the most frequently banned or challenged titles of the past year. Be sure to stop by and check it out as we’ll adding more titles as the week continues.

The top ten most frequently challenged books for the previous year as reported by the ALA’s Office of Intellectual Freedom include:

  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  2. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  3. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age groupcage
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E.L. James
    Reasons: Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  5. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  6. A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl, by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  9. Bless Me Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  10. Bone (series), by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence

For more information check out bannedbooksweek.org and for additional lists of recent and classic titles that have been challenged or banned in communities across the country check out The American Library Association’s Frequently Challenged Books page.

 

As mentioned in the Law School’s Spotlight series last week, the Avon Global Center for Women and Justice and the International Human Rights Clinic, both of Cornell Law School, and the Center for Law and Justice recently released a new handbook on juvenile law in Zambia.

The Handbook on Juvenile Law in Zambia, co-authored by students Chris Sarma ’15 and Amy Stephenson ’15, is the first handbook of its kind on Zambian juvenile law. For more information on the background of the handbook check out the previously mentioned Spotlight article, but also you can also view the handbook itself on Scholarship@Cornell Law.

From the the abstract:

Juveniles who come into contact with the law are a particularly vulnerable group. They may be victims of abuse, in moral danger and in need of care, or unaware of their rights when they are accused of committing a crime. Zambia’s domestic laws recognize this vulnerability of juveniles and grant them special legal protections. One ongoing challenge for juvenile protection is the lack of a compendium on Zambian juvenile law.

To improve access to information on Zambian juvenile law, the Center for Law and Justice and Cornell Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic have co-authored this juvenile law handbook. The handbook offers a compendium of Zambian juvenile law, including the processing of juveniles in the criminal justice system. It synthesizes relevant constitutional and statutory law, case law, and international human rights law and highlights best practices that practitioners may consider when working on matters involving juveniles.

This handbook serves as a reminder that legal practitioners, judicial officers, and citizens alike are responsible for protecting the rights of juveniles. I hope that judges, magistrates, prosecutors, and legal officers will make frequent use of this handbook. Doing so will help to ensure that juveniles in Zambia are able to access justice through the courts.

For more on the latest scholarly articles from the law school faculty visit the repository at Scholarship@Cornell Law.

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Private Equity at Work: When Wall Street Manages Main Street - Eileen Appelbaum, Rosemary Batt

private equity

Storytelling for Lawyers – Philip N. Meyer

storytelling

What Makes Law – Liam Murphy

what makes law

Welcome new and returning students! Whether you are brand new or returning for another year it never hurts to have a refresher on all the services the Cornell Law Library has to offer. For starters we recommend checking out our research guide Using the Law Library 101. You’ll find information on everything from hours of operation and collections to scheduling personalized research consultations.  101libguide

DSCN2221Join us for our Law Library Open on Tuesday, August 26, 1:15-4:15pm.

Library resources and services will be featured, including:

  • The Reference Desk and Research Assistance in the Library
  • Research Taught in Lawyering
  • Lexis, Westlaw and Bloomberg Passwords
  • Cool Stuff to Borrow at the Circulation Desk
  • Borrow Direct and Interlibrary Loan Services
  • After Hours Access
  • A Rare Book  Display
  • And More!

 

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Gruesome Spectacles : Botched Executions and America’s Death Penalty – Austin Sarat

gruesome

The Logic of Innovation : Intellectual Property, and What the User Found There- Johanna Gibson

logicofinnovation

Why Law Matters – Alon Harel

whylawmatters

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for July 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Capital in the Twenty-First Century – Thomas Piketty

capital

Bentham’s Theory of Law and Public Opinion –  Xiaobo Zhai; Michael Quinn

bentham

The Right to Health at the Public/Private Divide : A Global Comparative Study – Colleen M Flood; Aeyal M Gross

righttohealth

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for June 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Law and the Limits of Government : Temporary Versus Permanent Legislation – Frank Fagan

law and limits

The Criminology of War – Ruth Jamieson

crimwar

Foreign Policy : From Conception to Diplomatic Practice – Ernest Petrič

fp

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for February 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

 

Promoting the Rule of Law : A Practitioners’ Guide to Key Issues and Developments –  Lelia Mooney

rule of law

 

Interstate Liability for Climate Change-Related Damage – Elena Kosolapova

climate change

 

International Organizations : Politics, Law, Practice – Ian Hurd

international organizations

prizelogoJust a few more days to submit papers for the annual Cornell Law Library Robert Cantwell Prize for Exemplary Student Research.

Papers will be accepted on an ongoing basis through May 1, 2014.  The winners will be announced May 8, 2014.

Entries may include, but are not limited to, papers written for a class or journal notes.  All papers must have been written in the time period spanning May, 2013 – May, 2014.  Work product generated through summer or other employment will not be accepted.  Papers must be a minimum of 10 pages in length, must be written in proper Bluebook format, and must be properly footnoted.

First prize is $500, second prize is $250, and both winners will be invited to publish their papers in Scholarship@Cornell Law, a digital repository of the Cornell Law Library.  For submission procedure and selection criteria, please see here:  http://www.lawschool.cornell.edu/library/WhatWeDo/HelpStudents/PrizeStudentResearch.cfm

© 2014 InfoBrief Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha