Election day is right around the corner and if you're a political junky like we are then we've got the toy for you.

Voxgov analyzes and aggregates millions of files of government news and media allowing you to track issues, people or just about anything else produced by the federal government including policy statements, press releases and even social media posts. Right now they have a special section devoted to the midterms, allowing you to track, analyze and compare the media output of every House and Senate race this cycle.

Also, be sure to check out our other congressional and political resources at this research guide, where you'll find a trove of powerful tools that can make any legislative or political research project a much smoother and comprehensive process.

We have a few new services available at the Circulation Desk, to be aware of.

  • The Law Library now offers battery recycling.  Dispose of your batteries the environmentally friendly way by bringing your old batteries to the Circulation Desk.  Patrons are advised that the ends need to be taped or each battery should be placed in a separate bag to prevent problems arising from the ends touching and producing a chemical reaction.
  • We now also offer umbrellas that can be returned to any library on campus, in addition to many umbrellas that can be checked out exclusively from the law library.  The umbrellas have a 24 hour loan period.

To find out more about all the items that can be checked out at the Circulation Desk, including everything from iPads to volleyball nets visit the Cool Stuff page of our website.

walkingdeadFall means television season is back in full swing and few shows capture people's interest like AMC's The Walking Dead, which started its fifth season earlier this month.

The Law Library DVD collection boasts all four previous seasons of the show available for a seven day checkout period to allow plenty of time for quality binge-watching. So whether you want to catch up in time follow this season, or you're just in the mood for zombies, we've got you covered!

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for October 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Legally Married: Love and Law in the UK and the US – Scot Peterson; Ian McLean

legally married

A Report on Ubuntu - Leonhard Praeg

ubuntu

Renewable Energy Law and Development - Richard L. Ottinger

renewable

The Law Library will have reduced hours during fall break from October 11 -17.

Monday – Friday:   8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Reference Hours:  9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Weekends:             Closed

The start of the new Supreme Court term was dominated more by what the Court didn't do, than what it did. Still, there are plenty of cases to track and we've rounded up a few previews and other SCOTUS-watching resources to help you follow along.

  • LII Supreme Court Bulletin - Cornell’s Legal Information Institute provides previews of the 2014-2015 term with commentary on upcoming individual cases.
  • The American Bar Association has an aptly titled publication called Preview that provides analysis of the term and also provides copies of all available briefs.
  • PBS does a great job of covering the Court, posting both articles and commentary from the Newshour.
  • SCOTUSblog – considered one of the premier destinations for up to date information and analysis.
  • For many years, Nina Totenberg has been recognized for her coverage of the Court. Follow her on Twitter at @NinaTotenberg.
  • Jeffrey Toobin's commentary can be found on a variety of platforms and does much of his Court writing for the New Yorker.

 

We're having a book sale next week! The law library occasionally gets extra copies of books and in order to make room for new titles we pass them on to you at the unbeatable price of $1. We'll be adding titles as the sale goes along so stop by the Reading Room next week and take advantage!

book sale 2014

 

 

It's Banned Books Week, an annual event bringing together the entire book community to celebrate the freedom to read. BBW14_Profile_op3

According to the American Library Association 307 separate titles were challenged in the United States last year alone.

To celebrate we've put up an exhibit in the reading room featuring some of the most frequently banned or challenged titles of the past year. Be sure to stop by and check it out as we'll adding more titles as the week continues.

The top ten most frequently challenged books for the previous year as reported by the ALA's Office of Intellectual Freedom include:

  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  2. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  3. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age groupcage
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E.L. James
    Reasons: Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  5. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  6. A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl, by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  9. Bless Me Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  10. Bone (series), by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence

For more information check out bannedbooksweek.org and for additional lists of recent and classic titles that have been challenged or banned in communities across the country check out The American Library Association’s Frequently Challenged Books page.

 

As mentioned in the Law School's Spotlight series last week, the Avon Global Center for Women and Justice and the International Human Rights Clinic, both of Cornell Law School, and the Center for Law and Justice recently released a new handbook on juvenile law in Zambia.

The Handbook on Juvenile Law in Zambia, co-authored by students Chris Sarma '15 and Amy Stephenson '15, is the first handbook of its kind on Zambian juvenile law. For more information on the background of the handbook check out the previously mentioned Spotlight article, but also you can also view the handbook itself on Scholarship@Cornell Law.

From the the abstract:

Juveniles who come into contact with the law are a particularly vulnerable group. They may be victims of abuse, in moral danger and in need of care, or unaware of their rights when they are accused of committing a crime. Zambia’s domestic laws recognize this vulnerability of juveniles and grant them special legal protections. One ongoing challenge for juvenile protection is the lack of a compendium on Zambian juvenile law.

To improve access to information on Zambian juvenile law, the Center for Law and Justice and Cornell Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic have co-authored this juvenile law handbook. The handbook offers a compendium of Zambian juvenile law, including the processing of juveniles in the criminal justice system. It synthesizes relevant constitutional and statutory law, case law, and international human rights law and highlights best practices that practitioners may consider when working on matters involving juveniles.

This handbook serves as a reminder that legal practitioners, judicial officers, and citizens alike are responsible for protecting the rights of juveniles. I hope that judges, magistrates, prosecutors, and legal officers will make frequent use of this handbook. Doing so will help to ensure that juveniles in Zambia are able to access justice through the courts.

For more on the latest scholarly articles from the law school faculty visit the repository at Scholarship@Cornell Law.

The Law Library is pleased to announce that current Cornell faculty, students, and staff may now create Financial Times (FT.com) online accounts at no charge.

To create your account, while on campus (using either Cornell eduroam or Red Rover, or a Cornell hard-wired computer), navigate to https://registration.ft.com/corporate/signup/Oaq41Sl2OoGmS (popup enabling not required) or to http://www.ft.com/home/us (popup enabling required).  You should see a message inviting you to sign up to Cornell University Library’s subscription.  Follow the directions to register, using your Cornell email address ([your NetID]@cornell.edu).  You cannot register with a non-Cornell email address.

A few tips for using FT.com:

Is there a mobile app I can use?

  • Yes!  The FT web app is available for iPads, iPhones, Androids, and Windows phones) for no additional cost. Please go to apps.ft.com for more information. NOTE: The iPad and iPhone web apps are not downloaded via the app store.

Can I set up alerts? What other tools can I use?

What is FT Newslines? How do I use it?

Questions? Please contact Nina Scholtz, Digital Resources Librarian, at nes78@cornell.edu.

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