Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for February 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

 

Promoting the Rule of Law : A Practitioners’ Guide to Key Issues and Developments –  Lelia Mooney

rule of law

 

Interstate Liability for Climate Change-Related Damage – Elena Kosolapova

climate change

 

International Organizations : Politics, Law, Practice – Ian Hurd

international organizations

The Law Library is pleased to announce that our HeinOnline databases now include four new titles:

  • The American Law Institute Library includes the Restatements of the Law and associated drafts.  Restatement topics include Agency, Business Associations, Conflict of Laws, Contracts, Economic Torts and Related Wrongs, Employment Law, Foreign Relations Law, Information Privacy Principles, Judgments, Law Governing Lawyers, Law of American Indians, Property, Restatement in the Courts, Restitution and Unjust Enrichment, Sales of Land, Security, Suretyship and Guaranty, Torts, Trusts, Unfair Competition, and U.S. Law of International Commercial Arbitration.  Some topics are still in draft form only – but those drafts are included!  This Library also includes ALI Annual Reports (1937-2010), Proceedings of ALI Annual Meetings (1923-2011), ALI Annual Meeting Speeches (1923-current), ALI Reporter (vols. 1-33), Statement of Essential Human Rights Archive, Principles of the Law, Uniform Commercial Code (including drafts), Model Penal Code (including drafts and other miscellaneous documents, 1951-2011), ALI-ABA Periodicals and other ALI documents.
  • History of Bankruptcy: Taxation and Economic Reform in America, Part III includes legislative histories, treatises, documents, and other materials related to bankruptcy law in America; books dating back to the late 1700s; and links to scholarly articles useful in the study of bankruptcy law.
  • The U.S. International Trade Library includes more than 4,000 publications from the U.S. International Trade Commission, dating back to 1951; legislative histories of free trade agreements and trade statutes; more than 200 books about international trade; United States Court of International Trade Reports (1980-current), and other materials.
  • Women and the Law contains nearly 500,000 pages from books, biographies, and periodicals about women’s roles in society and the law.  It also includes more than 70 titles from Emory University Law School’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project.

Remember that HeinOnline databases include images of the original publications and allow full-text searching across each library.

We’ve also just purchased a large collection of law e-books from the publisher Edward Elgar.  They’re full-text searchable and include easy PDF downloads of chapters using the platform ElgarOnline. Click “Law-Academic” in the left column for the full list of over 400 e-books, then narrow to your chosen subject using the subject list in the left column.  New titles will be added throughout the year.

Another newly available database is voxgov. As the publisher explains, voxgov provides access to “unfiltered original source news, media and information direct from all branches of the U.S. Federal Government,”  including Facebook and Twitter posts from legislators and others.  Save your searches and set up email alerts by registering for a free myvoxgov account.

HOLlogo_fullcolorJust in time to catch the end of Women’s History Month we’re unveiling our latest database from HeinOnline: Women and the Law (Peggy). From the publisher:

“This unique collection of materials provides a platform to research the progression of women’s roles and rights in society over the past 200 years.  Also included are more than 70 titles from Emory University Law School’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project, which provide a platform to view the effect of law and culture on the female gender.”

For more information on what’s included in the collection check the brochure provided in the link above or contact Nina Scholtz (nes78@cornell.edu), Digital Resources Librarian.

New in HeinOHOLlogo_fullcolornline, the Selden Society Publications and the History of Early English Law contains searchable digital images of the entire series of Selden Society publications and Ames Foundations publications, as well as other useful materials on English legal history, all searchable in one location.  The Selden Society Annual Series includes scholarly editions of essential common-law source materials back to the Middle Ages.  Publications of the Ames Foundation include modern scholarly editions of the Year Books to Richard II (1377-1399) in the original languages and translated into modern English and other sources of early English legal history.

If you have questions about our new databases, please contact Nina Scholtz (nes78@cornell.edu), Digital Resources Librarian.

eisenberg_2000As the Cornell Law School mourns the death of Professor Theodore Eisenberg, the Law Library is taking a moment to feature his groundbreaking legal scholarship.

A pioneer in the field of empirical legal studies, the uniqueness of his scholarship was equally matched by his productivity, authoring or coauthoring over 125 scholarly articles and writing or contributing to over 20 books. Additionally he founded the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies in 2004, which is consistently regarded as one of the most influential publications in the field.

Many of Professor Eisenberg’s works are currently featured on our Scholarship@Cornell Law repository, where his use of statistical methodology to gain new insights into punitive damages, capital juries and myriad of other diverse topics is on full display and serves as a tribute to the legacy of one of Cornell Law’s true intellectual and creative forces.

The library has recently acquired the EBSCOhost database Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text. The database features close to 500,000 records from the most influential publications in the discipline, including full text for nearly 300 journals and magazines, according to the publisher.

The database may be used by all Cornell students, faculty, and staff both on and off campus with the link given above.

Questions? Contact Nina Scholtz, Digital Resources Librarian, or Law Library Reference.

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for February 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Minds, Brains, and Law : The Conceptual Foundations of Law and Neuroscience – Michael S. Pardo; Dennis M. Patterson

minds

Law and Gender – Joanne Conaghan

lawandgender

Framing the Net : The Internet and Human Rights – Rikke Frank Jørgensen

framing

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for January 2014 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Law and Social Theory – Reza Banakar; Max Travers

http://coverart.oclc.org/ImageWebSvc/oclc/+-+209273603_140.jpg?SearchOrder=+-+OT,OS,TN,AV,GO,FA

Research Methods in Law – Dawn Watkins; Mandy Burton

Research methods in law

Neutrality and Theory of Law – Jordi F. Beltran; Jose J. Moreso; Diego M. Papayannis

Neutrality and theory of law

Every month the Cornell Law Library adds new titles to its collection. The most recent additions for December 2013 are posted, here. A few highlights from this month’s additions are featured below.

Selected Titles

bermanLaw and Language : Effective Symbols of Community – Harold J. Berman; John Witte

 

 

 

wilson International Responses to Issues of Credit and Over-Indebtedness in the Wake of Crisis – Therese Wilson

 

 

 

animal Animal Cruelty :A Multidisciplinary Approach to Understanding – Mary P. Brewster; Cassandra Reyes

 

 

 

 

Abraham_Lincoln_November_1863

This month marks the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. The speech is sometimes referred to as the greatest closing argument in history, in part because Lincoln himself spent his early career as a lawyer in Illinois.

The law library has numerous books available for checkout detailing Lincoln’s career as a lawyer and covering his skill as an orator. One of the more recent examples is Arthur Rizer’s Lincoln’s Counsel: Lessons from America’s Most Persuasive Speaker, published by the American Bar Association.

From the publisher’s website:

Before Abraham Lincoln was called “Mr. President,” he was called “counselor” and “esquire.” Some consider him to be one of the nation’s greatest attorneys and, at the very least, an enormously persuasive speaker. He spent more years practicing law than any other president, and his years in the legal profession were essential to his eventual election to the Presidency.

As a lawyer, Lincoln knew how to craft successful closing arguments. As a president–with his Gettysburg Address, perhaps the greatest closing argument in history–he knew how to persuade a bitterly divided country into ultimately doing what was right for all.

Through examples from Lincoln’s great speeches and closing arguments–included in their entirety are Lincoln’s First and Second Inaugural Speeches, the Gettysburg Address, the Emancipation Proclamation and more–this book instructs you in the art of persuasion in two simple ways: by providing lessons from Lincoln’s career as a lawyer and politician, and then by analyzing those lessons and discussing how to apply them to your own life. Lincoln’s Counsel gives important advice about advocacy straight from the very best.

Also, due to Cornell possessing one of the original copies of the address, be sure to check out the commemorative events taking place around campus this month by visiting the university’s events calendar here.

 

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