A few months ago we told you about our collection of U.S. Supreme Court bobblehead dolls on display in the Reading Room.  They’ll be on view for another couple of weeks, so come on in and check them out.

 

If you’re studying, working on, or interested in foreign and international business, labor, or regulatory matters, you should be familiar with Getting the Deal Through (GTDT).  Purchased by the Cornell Law Library, and available for use by the entire Cornell community, GTDT is a current awareness service that provides guides to law and regulations in 48 practice areas and more than 150 countries worldwide.

GTDT’s current awareness guides address numerous questions about law and regulation in countries around the world.  For example, in the new guide Foreign Investment Review 2012, some of the questions answered are:

  1. What, in general terms, are your government’s policies and practices regarding oversight and review of foreign investment?
  2. What are the main laws that directly or indirectly regulate acquisitions and investments by foreign nationals on the basis of the national interest?
  3. How is a foreign investor or foreign investment defined in the applicable law?
  4. Are there special rules for investments made by foreign state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and sovereign wealth funds (SWFs)? How is an SOE or SWF defined?

These questions, and 19 more, are answered for each of 26 jurisdictions worldwide.   GTDT also recently added 2012 guides to telecom, gas regulation, banking regulation, mergers and acquisitions, labor and employment, anti-corruption regulation, and merger control.

Cornell students, faculty, and staff may access GTDT here or through the Cornell University Library Catalog.

Looking for some lighter reading this summer?  The Law Library’s Popular Reading collection is available on reserve at the Circulation Desk.  In addition, the library stacks hold a variety of novels and short stories for those interested in lawyers, courtrooms, and the law.  Here are a few for you to consider: 

If you want something in the vein of Grisham and Turow, consider Milton Hirsch’s The Shadow of Justice. Hirsch, a former prosecutor and current defense attorney, tells the story of a trial for cocaine possession in a Miami courthouse.  The book was the ABA’s first venture into the field of mystery publishing.   Another courtroom drama is played out in Alan Dershowitz’s first venture into fiction, The Advocate’s Devil.  Fast-paced and entertaining, this celebrity trial novel follows a defense lawyer’s efforts to acquit a famous and charismatic basketball player on rape charges in the face of his increasing suspicion the basketball star is guilty.

Kermit Roosevelt’s In the Shadow of the Law turns from the courtroom to law firm life.  Roosevelt (who left the practice of law to become a law professor) is set in Washington, D.C. biglaw.  While its plot tracks the resolution of two cases – a murder and a chemical plant explosion – the novel also delves into the inner lives of the firm’s partners and associates.

 

 

 

The short story collection When Tutt Meets Tutt features Ephraim Tutt, a long-running Saturday Evening Post character invented by Arthur Train.  The title story of this 1927 collection tells the humorous story of a will contest fought by attorneys whose partnership has temporarily broken up.

If you prefer British courtrooms, step back a few decades into the world of Henry Cecil, one of the most amusing novelists about the British legal system.  Typical of Cecil’s style is the Roger Thursby trilogy.  In Brothers in Law, Thursby, a newly qualified young barrister, makes his debut in the Old Bailey defending a con artist.  Thursby, now a 12-year veteran of the bar, defends a case of police bribery in Friends at Court.  Finally, ten or so years later, Sober as a Judge advances Thursby to the rank of high court judge.  Also set in British courtrooms, but in the murder mystery genre, is Tragedy at Law by Cyril Hare, in which Mr. Justice Barber – a very nasty judge indeed — travels the circuit in World War II England on his way to being murdered.

Trial and Error: An Oxford Anthology of Legal Stories includes excerpts from novels such Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird and Anthony Trollope’s Lady Anna.  Also included are short stories, for example Philip Roth’s “Eli, the Fanatic.”  Still more legal stories are found in Best Legal Stories and Best Legal Stories 2, both edited by John Welcome.

Finally, if you’re interested in pursuing more courtroom fiction, Jon L. Breen’s bibliography Novel Verdicts: A Guide to Courtroom Fiction provides descriptions of over 400 novels and short story collections published before 1984.

You gave the Law Library an outstanding return rate on the recent Student Survey, and we are pouring over the results now.  For those of you who commented that you wish the library had a certain book or other items, we don’t want you to be bereft any longer.  These were here all along:

New York Times and Wall St. Journal – How could we all live without these daily newspapers?  The current issues are on the Circulation Desk counter and then available behind the desk for one month.

Israeli Human Rights Yearbook – Computers are so literal.  You have to type in the Title correctly, or they will be contrary.  The title is Israel Yearbook on Human Rights, and the Law Library has all volumes 1-41, from 1971-2011, on the new ground floor at K3236.3 .I87.

Model Penal Code Online –That’s available on your friends Westlaw (ULS-MPC) and Lexis (MODPEN).

Tribal Codes and Cases – Check out HeinOnline.  It’s not just for journals any more!  Go to the American Indian Law Collection. “With nearly 800 unique titles and more than 765,000 pages dedicated to American Indian Law, this collection includes an expansive archive of treaties, federal statutes and regulations, federal case law, tribal codes, constitutions, and jurisprudence.”

Chinese Law Dictionary – Two good ones are in the reference collection in the Reading Room, alcove 3.  英汉-汉英双向法律词典 = An English-Chinese and Chinese-English Two-Way Law Dictionary at K52.C5 Y59x.7 and Ying Han fa lü ci dian = English-Chinese Dictionary of Law at K52.C5 Y566x.

Terry Pratchett and dogs – Olin Library has all of this author’s books and will send them to the Law Library for you to pick up.  Just find the title you want in the online catalog and click the REQUESTS button at the top.  Then select BOOK DELIVERY SYSTEM from the drop-down menu at the bottom; click OK.  Select Law Circulation for where you will pick it up.

Be sure and check with a reference librarian if you aren’t finding what you need.  We’ll be happy to help!

Need a break from casebooks, hornbooks, Restatements, and cite-checking?  Give yourself a diversion with a bestseller.  The Law Library has a new collection of popular reading materials just added to the Law Library’s Reserve area located behind the Circulation Desk.  The books are available for a two week loan period with one renewal allowed.  Sample titles include:

Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, by Manning Marable

The Litigators, by John Grisham

Too Big to Fail, by Andrew Ross Sorkin

Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen

Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson

The Law Library is pleased to announce its new exhibit of recently acquired Supreme Court bobbleheads. Created and distributed by The Green Bag, each wobbly Justice is fashioned in the interest of “scholarly artistry,” simply for the fun of it. The bobbleheads, together with explanatory notes, are available for viewing in the Law Library’s Reading Room display cases throughout the spring semester.

The Green Bag is a self-described “quarterly journal of short, readable, useful, and sometimes entertaining legal scholarship.” The Law Library thanks Ross E. Davies, Editor in Chief of The Green Bag, for his assistance in building the collection.

The New Books List for October 1-15 is now available on the Law Library web site. Click here to view the entire list. It includes the new books at the Law Library as well as law-related books all across campus. Here are a couple titles of interest:

Principles of law and economics / Daniel H. Cole, Peter Z. Grossman. — New York : Wolters Kluwer Law & Business/Aspen Publishers, c2011
Special Reserve KF385 .C65x 2011 — Law Library

What’s law got to do with it? : what judges do, why they do it, and what’s at stake / edited by Charles Gardner Geyh. — Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2011
KF8775.A75 W48x 2011 — Law Library

Click here to sign up for semi-monthly RSS feed of the new law books at the Law Library.

The Law library is hosting an open house for all students on Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 11:00am-1:00pm, in the Gould Reading Room. Library resources and services will be featured at stations throughout the room, including:

• An introduction to “hidden” online databases;
• Information regarding personalized research consultations;
• An overview of upper level research classes;
• Our open access repository of Cornell student and faculty scholarship;
• Demonstrations of our library catalog and interlibrary loan services;
• A rare book display;
• And more.

Students who visit every station will receive a library pen and be entered in a grand prize drawing to win their choice of two round trip Campus-to-Campus bus tickets to New York City, or a limousine wine tour for 2-4 people. Other prize drawings will feature $25 gift certificates to local businesses including Gimme! Coffee, Cinemapolis, and Purity Ice Cream. Drawings will occur at 1pm; students need not be present to win.

A book sale will be held simultaneously with the open house. All books will be available for $1 at the East end of the Reading Room.

Join us for some quick, informative fun and snag a seasonal snack from Cornell Orchards!

Collateral Knowledge coverToday Cornell Law School celebrates the publication of Professor Annelise Riles‘ new book Collateral Knowledge: Legal Reasoning in the Global Financial Markets.  Prof. Riles is the Jack G. Clarke ’52 Professor of Far Eastern Legal Studies and Director of the Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture.  The book examines how the financial markets are governed not only by legislatures that pass laws (from the top down), but also by  people and entities that participate in the system (from the bottom up), ranging from academics to people who fill out financial forms.  Prof. Riles engages her topic by means of ethnographic study in Japan.

The book is available in the library and from amazon.com.  I also recommend Professor Riles’ interesting blog, also entitled Collateral Knowledge, where she continues the discussion.

World Intellectual Property Day 2011Tuesday, April 26 is World Intellectual Property Day, celebrated each year since 2000 and established by the World Intellectual Property Organization. The aim is to demonstrate how the IP system fosters not only music, arts and entertainment, but also all the products and technological innovations that help to shape our world. This day commemorates the date on which the Convention establishing WIPO originally entered into force in 1970.

For your IP research, you are invited to use these top-notch resources at Cornell Law Library:

  • BNA Intellectual Property Law Resource Center
  • IP Theory — a new peer-edited intellectual property law publication
  • JIPITEC – open access journal on intellectual property, information technology, and e-commerce law
  • Nimmer on Copyright – available on Lexis and on reserve in the law library (11 volumes)
  • McCarthy on Trademarks and Unfair Competition – available on Westlaw and on reserve in the law library (7 volumes)
  • Chisum on Patents – available on Lexis
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