The Law Library is pleased to announce that our HeinOnline databases now include four new titles:

  • The American Law Institute Library includes the Restatements of the Law and associated drafts.  Restatement topics include Agency, Business Associations, Conflict of Laws, Contracts, Economic Torts and Related Wrongs, Employment Law, Foreign Relations Law, Information Privacy Principles, Judgments, Law Governing Lawyers, Law of American Indians, Property, Restatement in the Courts, Restitution and Unjust Enrichment, Sales of Land, Security, Suretyship and Guaranty, Torts, Trusts, Unfair Competition, and U.S. Law of International Commercial Arbitration.  Some topics are still in draft form only – but those drafts are included!  This Library also includes ALI Annual Reports (1937-2010), Proceedings of ALI Annual Meetings (1923-2011), ALI Annual Meeting Speeches (1923-current), ALI Reporter (vols. 1-33), Statement of Essential Human Rights Archive, Principles of the Law, Uniform Commercial Code (including drafts), Model Penal Code (including drafts and other miscellaneous documents, 1951-2011), ALI-ABA Periodicals and other ALI documents.
  • History of Bankruptcy: Taxation and Economic Reform in America, Part III includes legislative histories, treatises, documents, and other materials related to bankruptcy law in America; books dating back to the late 1700s; and links to scholarly articles useful in the study of bankruptcy law.
  • The U.S. International Trade Library includes more than 4,000 publications from the U.S. International Trade Commission, dating back to 1951; legislative histories of free trade agreements and trade statutes; more than 200 books about international trade; United States Court of International Trade Reports (1980-current), and other materials.
  • Women and the Law contains nearly 500,000 pages from books, biographies, and periodicals about women’s roles in society and the law.  It also includes more than 70 titles from Emory University Law School’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project.

Remember that HeinOnline databases include images of the original publications and allow full-text searching across each library.

We’ve also just purchased a large collection of law e-books from the publisher Edward Elgar.  They’re full-text searchable and include easy PDF downloads of chapters using the platform ElgarOnline. Click “Law-Academic” in the left column for the full list of over 400 e-books, then narrow to your chosen subject using the subject list in the left column.  New titles will be added throughout the year.

Another newly available database is voxgov. As the publisher explains, voxgov provides access to “unfiltered original source news, media and information direct from all branches of the U.S. Federal Government,”  including Facebook and Twitter posts from legislators and others.  Save your searches and set up email alerts by registering for a free myvoxgov account.

HOLlogo_fullcolorJust in time to catch the end of Women's History Month we're unveiling our latest database from HeinOnline: Women and the Law (Peggy). From the publisher:

"This unique collection of materials provides a platform to research the progression of women’s roles and rights in society over the past 200 years.  Also included are more than 70 titles from Emory University Law School’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project, which provide a platform to view the effect of law and culture on the female gender."

For more information on what's included in the collection check the brochure provided in the link above or contact Nina Scholtz (nes78@cornell.edu), Digital Resources Librarian.

New in HeinOHOLlogo_fullcolornline, the Selden Society Publications and the History of Early English Law contains searchable digital images of the entire series of Selden Society publications and Ames Foundations publications, as well as other useful materials on English legal history, all searchable in one location.  The Selden Society Annual Series includes scholarly editions of essential common-law source materials back to the Middle Ages.  Publications of the Ames Foundation include modern scholarly editions of the Year Books to Richard II (1377-1399) in the original languages and translated into modern English and other sources of early English legal history.

If you have questions about our new databases, please contact Nina Scholtz (nes78@cornell.edu), Digital Resources Librarian.

The library has recently acquired the EBSCOhost database Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text. The database features close to 500,000 records from the most influential publications in the discipline, including full text for nearly 300 journals and magazines, according to the publisher.

The database may be used by all Cornell students, faculty, and staff both on and off campus with the link given above.

Questions? Contact Nina Scholtz, Digital Resources Librarian, or Law Library Reference.

The law library has a new resource available designed to help researchers navigate international legislation and case law regarding the acquisition and ownership of artwork.

Art Law & Cultural Property from the International Foundation for Art Research contains resources and information covering legislation that governs the export and ownership of cultural property from dozens of countries with primarily a European focus. Additionally, it covers case law and hard-to-find out of court settlement documents pertaining to art ownership issues in the United States.

The database is available to all Cornell students, faculty, and staff both on and off campus with the link given above.

 

"The False Prophet!" shrieks one cover.  "Confession of Ann Walters, the Murderess!" proclaims another.  "Death in the Mail" is the lurid title of a third.

These are all pamphlets digitized in the Cornell University Law Library Trial Pamphlets Collection, which has just received the American Association of Law Libraries' Law Library Publications Award, Nonprint Division.

We call them trial pamphlets because most are contemporary accounts of trials of prominent citizens or that dealt with especially controversial or lurid topics.  Some are confessions; some include "execution sermons" (in which readers were given a moral lecture).  As the titles quoted suggest, they were sold to a public eager to learn the juicy details of a recent murder or other crime.

For present day scholars, the pamphlets offer not only valuable evidence, such as trial transcripts, frequently not available elsewhere, but also indications of the political, economic, and social transformation of the United States, especially in the 19th century.

The trial pamphlets are freely available for full-text searching or browsing on the Trial Pamphlets Collection site.  Law Library staff responsible for the project are Thomas Mills, Associate Director for Collections and Administration and Rare Book Curator, and Janet Gillespie, Access Services Manager.  Barbara Berger Eden, Cornell University Library's Director of Preservation, and the entire project staff made the digital collection possible.

Just posted in Scholarship@Cornell Law is "Unborn Communities," a working paper by Gregory S. Alexander, A. Robert Noll Professor of Law at Cornell. From the abstract:

Do property owners owe obligations to members of future generations? Although the question can be reframed in rights-terms so that it faces rights-oriented theories of property, it seems to pose a greater challenge to those theories of property that directly focus on the obligations that property owners owe to others rather than (or, better, along with) the rights of owner. The challenge is compounded where such theories emphasize the relationships between individual property owners and the various communities to which they belong. Do those communities include members of future generations? This paper addresses these questions as they apply to a property theory that I have developed in recent work, a theory that we can call the human-flourishing theory of property.

If you're not familiar with Scholarship@Cornell Law, it's Cornell Law Library's digital repository of 1,000 scholarly articles, papers, and presentations, all available online, for free.  Scholarship@Cornell Law is part of bePress's Law Commons, where Cornell Law Library has one of the top five most popular repositories.

While both published and working papers by Cornell law faculty make up the bulk of Scholarship@Cornell Law, we also have papers by students, including winners of the Cornell Law Library Prize for Exemplary Student ResearchPapers from many different law school centers and programs, the Avon Global Center for Women and Justice and Dorothea S. Clarke Program in Feminist Jurisprudence and the Cornell e-Rulemaking Initiative are also found at Scholarship@Cornell Law.

With These HandsIn 1950, the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) sponsored a documentary, With These Hands, to celebrate its first fifty years.  While previous labor films had not been successful, With These Hands used Hollywood professionals—the director was Jack Arnold, who would go on to direct 1950s cult classics such as Creature from the Black Lagoon and television episodes of popular shows—and was much more popular with audiences.  Ultimately, it was nominated for the Best Documentary Oscar in 1951.

Tonight, the Catherwood Library and the Kheel Center, part of the Cornell ILR School, are sponsoring the first public showing of With These Hands in almost fifty years.  The film will screen at 5:00 pm in 105 Ives Hall.

For more information about the film and its history, see the Kheel Center's February 22 announcement, with a bibliography of archival materials in Kheel Center collections, written and compiled by Katie Dowgiewicz, ILGWU Project Archivist.

 

We've just acquired a new book that should be of interest to many of our students.  In Chambers: A Guide for Judicial Clerks and Externs by Jennifer L. Sheppard, Associate Professor of Law, Mercer University, is now available on reserve in the Law Library Reading Room (ask at the circulation desk during normal library hours). 

Professor Sheppard offers guidance on everything from attire to court organization and process to drafting an opinion. A sample bench memorandum is included, as are chapters on standards of review and drafting jury instructions.

Students looking ahead to obtaining a clerkship will also find the book useful, as it includes a chapter explaining the application process as well as sample resumes and cover letters.

While this book may be used only in the Reading Room, other books on this topic are available for checkout. Search our library catalog for the subject heading "law clerks United States".  We also have Law Clerk Handbook: A Handbook for Law Clerks to Federal Judges, edited by Sylvan A. Sobel, available online through HeinOnline.

Cornell law students interested in speaking with a reference librarian about legal research for an upcoming externship or clerkship may request a research consultation at the circulation desk.

We have two new Hein databases available for use by all Cornell faculty, students, and staff.

This database includes reports, decisions, and records of several of the most important federal agencies, including the  Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).  Complete collections of case reports from these and other agencies are included.  The documents are images of the originals.

This database includes the entirety of Cheryl Nyberg and Carol Boast Robertson's Subject Compilations Bibliography Series, previously available at Cornell Law Library in print only.  Users can now search the full text and link directly to articles in HeinOnline and many freely available web resources.  The database also includes many other multistate surveys of law.

If you have any questions about using these databases, please contact Cornell Law Library Reference.  For information about other new databases at Cornell Law Library, see Update on law library databases.

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