Book Sale

Net neutrality has been back in the news in a big way following the D.C. Circuit Court's decision in Verizon v. F.C.C.  to strike down many key provisions of the agency's open-internet rules.  The decision was a monumental one, but far from then end of the debate with President Obama indicating Friday that he expects the FCC to revisit the issue in some fashion. The immediate fallout from the decision and what happens next remain to be seen, but in the meantime here's a few links from around the web covering the issue from a variety of perspectives.

"Disruptions: Paying to Travel in the Internet's Fast Lanes" - Nick Bilton- New York Times

"A FEMA-level fail’: The Law Professor who Coined ‘Net Neutrality’ Lashes Out at the FCC’s Legal Strategy" - Brian Fung - Washington Post

"Verizon's Net Neutrality Victory Means More Fighting to Come - Joshua Brustein" - Bloomberg Businessweek

"Calm Down. The Courts Didn’t Just End the Open Internet." - Ezra Klein - Washington Post 

"Netflix Neutrality: Court Ruling Won't Boost Your Netflix Bill. Yet." - Joan E. Solsman- CNET

Would you like to enhance your resume?  The Law Library Research Fellow Program has an opening for a second or third-year Cornell Law student.  Fellows conduct research for faculty who do not have their own research assistant, or who need additional help with a project.  Research Fellow’s hours are flexible, and they have the same pay rate as other Law School faculty RAs.  To apply, send your resume to Matt Morrison, mmm72@cornell.edu.

  • Carrels located on the first, fourth, new ground, and basement floors may be reserved for one semester at a time by 2Ls, 3Ls, LLMs, and exchange students.
  • Each carrel must be shared by two students. Students may select a carrel partner or choose to have the library assign one.
  • Carrels located on the second floor may not be reserved and are available daily on a first-come, first served basis to all law students.
  • See Janet Gillespie personally in room 352 to reserve a carrel.
  • Questions may be directed to Janet at jmg32@cornell.edu or 607-255-5854.
  • All carrels are numbered. A map of the carrels will be made available with the signup form for easy identification.

SPRING 2014 SIGN UP DATES:

Wednesday, January 22 8am-12pm

1pm-5pm

For students serving on journals, moot courts, or working for a professor
Thursday, January 23 8am-12pm

1pm-5pm

For all other 2Ls, 3Ls, LLMs, and exchange students

Check out a few of the photos from yesterday's pet therapy event. A big thanks to the Cornell Companions program and the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund Club for their time and efforts in making this event possible every semester!

Ben Rudofsky (3L) is the winner of the Halloween Research Competition and will receive a $25 gift card to the Cornell Store. Congratulations to all of you who had the correct answer of Royal v. Grounds, 471 F. App'x 324 (5th Cir. 2012).

The lesson - as always - vampires DO NOT have civil rights...or something.

nosferatu

Enter our research competition to win a $25 gift card to the Cornell Store! The rules are easy: email the answer to the question below to mjw332@cornell.edu by midnight on October 31. We will draw a winner from the pool of correct answers next week and announce it on the blog.

The Problem:

Bill Compton, a Louisiana prisoner and vampire, is claiming the prison where he is serving his sentence is violating his civil rights. Compton asserts that as Vampire King of the State of Louisiana, he has been barred from practicing his religion related to his role as leader of the vampires, which includes access to necessary food items such as real human blood rather than the Tru Blood synthetic bottled version that the prison has provided him.

Compton’s civil rights suit was rejected in district court on summary judgment and he appealed that decision in a federal circuit court. That court subsequently dismissed his claim as frivolous and noted that the suit counted as a “strike” under 28. U.S.C. 1915.

Locate a factually similar case involving a self-proclaimed vampire that inspired the story above. Send in the name of the case and the citation to mjw332@cornell.edu by midnight, October 31 for a chance to win the $25 Cornell Store gift card.

Despite the government shutdown the Supreme Court began its new term last week. To kickoff the start of the new session we've collected a few helpful resources and links for tracking the latest SCOTUS news and developments:

  • SCOTUSblog - considered one the premier destinations for up to date information and analysis.
  • LII Supreme Court Bulletin - Cornell's Legal Information Institute provides previews of the 2013-2014 term as a whole as well as previews and commentary of upcoming individual cases.
  • PBS does a great job of covering the Court, posting both articles and commentary from the Newshour.
  • For many years, Nina Totenberg has been recognized for her coverage of the Court. Follow her on Twitter at @NinaTotenberg.

The Law Library will have reduced hours during fall break from October 12 -18.

Monday - Friday:   8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Reference Hours:  9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Weekends:             Closed

As classes end and we begin the exam period, the Law Library has restricted access from April 28 through May 14. During restricted access the Law Library is open to law school affiliates, university faculty, and non-law students conducting legal research.  The Law Library continues to be sensitive to the needs of the university community during exams, and non-law students who need to retrieve books or obtain research assistance are welcome to visit the library for those purposes.

Good luck on exams one and all!

 

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