The Law Library will close at 5 p.m. Wednesday, November 21.  It will also be closed Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, November 22-24, and then reopen on Sunday, November 25, during regular Sunday hours.

Law community, if you need travel reading, we have e-books and audiobooks available for checkout to your mobile device.

Happy Thanksgiving!

We’re pleased to announce the publication of our annual report, Cornell University Law Library: A Year in Review 2011/2012.  It includes a Message from the Director, reports on Collections, Information Management, Reference and Research Services, and Access Services, an in-depth discussion of our digitization of the Trial Pamphlets Collection, and a list of our librarians’ professional activities.  Some of the highlights from the past year that you can learn more about in the annual report include new librarians and staff, a new popular reading collection (both print and online), library materials on the move, added Sunday reference desk staffing, increased circulation of library materials, and a visit from Cornell Companions, a pet visitation program sponsored by the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine (a picture of the llama is in the annual report).

For graphs, pictures, and more, visit Cornell University Law Library: A Year in Review 2011/2012.

Just arrived in the law library–a free phone-charging kiosk!  Located in the scanner alcove, the kiosk has three kinds of charge cords: mini USB, micro USB, and the Apple 30-pin dock connector.  We expect to have the new Lightning charger for the iPhone 5 soon.  (Note that you do not supply the cord–it is part of the kiosk.)

The best part? The kiosk needs only 15 minutes to give your phone a full charge.

If you have questions about the kiosk, please contact Technology Services Librarian Dan Blackaby.

The library is implementing a new carrel reservation system this year, as follows:

• Carrels located on the first, fourth, new ground, and basement floors may be reserved for one semester at a time by 2Ls, 3Ls, LLMs, and exchange students.
• Students must sign up in person to reserve carrels on a first-come, first-served basis. The sign-up period will span two days. The first day is reserved for students who are serving on journals or working for a professor. The second day is open to the remainder of the students identified above.
• Each carrel must be shared by two students. Students may choose a carrel partner or elect to have the library assign one.
• Carrels located on the second floor may not be reserved and are available daily on a first-come, first served basis.
STUDENTS MAY SIGN UP FOR CARRELS ON WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, and THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6. Please come to Janet Gillespie’s office, room 352, in person, between the hours of 8am-12pm and 1pm-5pm. (Please note that Janet also works shifts at the circulation desk, so you may occasionally find her there.) All carrels are numbered. A map of the carrels will be made available with the signup form for easy identification.
• All questions may be directed via e-mail or telephone to Janet Gillespie (607-255-5854).

The law library has launched a one year pilot of OverDrive, a service offering downloadable popular and classic e-audiobooks and e-books, for Cornell Law School students, faculty, and staff.

For instructions on getting started and to browse the collection, please go to http://www.lawschool.cornell.edu/library/WhatWeHave/Overdrive.cfm to sign in with your NetID and password.  E-books and e-audiobooks  can be downloaded to your PC, Mac®, and many mobile devices, including iPads, iPods, and Kindles. Since titles will automatically expire at the end of the lending period, there are no late fees.

Comments? Title suggestions? Please let us know what you think of this new service!

The Law Library will host an open house for 1L’s, LLMs and exchange students tomorrow, Tuesday, August 21, from noon to 2:30pm.  Join us to meet our staff, pick up some swag, and be introduced to a variety of helpful resources and services, including:

  • Lexis, Westlaw & Bloomberg passwords
  • Cool stuff to borrow
  • After Hours Access
  • Rare Book Room
  • Interlibrary Loan & Borrow Direct
  • Upper Level Research Courses
  • Eating Area
  • How to use our catalog
  • Library website & subject-specific databases
  • Where and how to check out course reserves
  • And more!
Jean Pajerek

Jean Pajerek

Jean Pajerek, the Law Library’s Associate Director for Information Management, is one of the presenters of “Launching into RDA: The New Frontier” at the American Association of Law Libraries conference this weekend.  Jean also prepared “FRBR Meets RDA,” training materials explaining the relationships between the new cataloging standard, Resource Description and Access, and Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records.  “FRBR Meets RDA” has been nationally recognized as among the best freely available RDA training materials by the Library of Congress Program for Cooperative Cataloging’s RDA Training Materials Task Force.  The Task Force’s report recommending Jean’s materials is available at the Library of Congress’s Catalogers Learning Workshop.

At the conference in Boston on Sunday, July 22, at 3:45 p.m., Jean and her co-presenter, Patricia Sayre McCoy of the University of Chicago’s D’Angelo Law Library, will describe the Cornell Law Library’s and the D’Angelo Law Library’s experiences transitioning to the new standard ahead of three national U.S. libraries.  Jean and Pat’s presentation about RDA at last year’s conference is available on YouTube.

Looking for some lighter reading this summer?  The Law Library’s Popular Reading collection is available on reserve at the Circulation Desk.  In addition, the library stacks hold a variety of novels and short stories for those interested in lawyers, courtrooms, and the law.  Here are a few for you to consider: 

If you want something in the vein of Grisham and Turow, consider Milton Hirsch’s The Shadow of Justice. Hirsch, a former prosecutor and current defense attorney, tells the story of a trial for cocaine possession in a Miami courthouse.  The book was the ABA’s first venture into the field of mystery publishing.   Another courtroom drama is played out in Alan Dershowitz’s first venture into fiction, The Advocate’s Devil.  Fast-paced and entertaining, this celebrity trial novel follows a defense lawyer’s efforts to acquit a famous and charismatic basketball player on rape charges in the face of his increasing suspicion the basketball star is guilty.

Kermit Roosevelt’s In the Shadow of the Law turns from the courtroom to law firm life.  Roosevelt (who left the practice of law to become a law professor) is set in Washington, D.C. biglaw.  While its plot tracks the resolution of two cases – a murder and a chemical plant explosion – the novel also delves into the inner lives of the firm’s partners and associates.

 

 

 

The short story collection When Tutt Meets Tutt features Ephraim Tutt, a long-running Saturday Evening Post character invented by Arthur Train.  The title story of this 1927 collection tells the humorous story of a will contest fought by attorneys whose partnership has temporarily broken up.

If you prefer British courtrooms, step back a few decades into the world of Henry Cecil, one of the most amusing novelists about the British legal system.  Typical of Cecil’s style is the Roger Thursby trilogy.  In Brothers in Law, Thursby, a newly qualified young barrister, makes his debut in the Old Bailey defending a con artist.  Thursby, now a 12-year veteran of the bar, defends a case of police bribery in Friends at Court.  Finally, ten or so years later, Sober as a Judge advances Thursby to the rank of high court judge.  Also set in British courtrooms, but in the murder mystery genre, is Tragedy at Law by Cyril Hare, in which Mr. Justice Barber – a very nasty judge indeed — travels the circuit in World War II England on his way to being murdered.

Trial and Error: An Oxford Anthology of Legal Stories includes excerpts from novels such Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird and Anthony Trollope’s Lady Anna.  Also included are short stories, for example Philip Roth’s “Eli, the Fanatic.”  Still more legal stories are found in Best Legal Stories and Best Legal Stories 2, both edited by John Welcome.

Finally, if you’re interested in pursuing more courtroom fiction, Jon L. Breen’s bibliography Novel Verdicts: A Guide to Courtroom Fiction provides descriptions of over 400 novels and short story collections published before 1984.

Throughout the year, Research Librarians provide customized sessions with individual students to prepare for their summer jobs, clerkships, public interest work, and post-graduate positions. These consultations become even more valuable as you prepare for summer employment. Tailored advice includes, but is not limited to, specific jurisdictional sources, key resources in substantive practice areas, and advanced research skills and strategies. Consultations can be as short as 15 minutes or last up to 60 minutes. Our registration form allows you to specify your interests and needs, and request a particular Research Librarian if desired. Forms are available at the Circulation Desk in the Reading Room and here.

As classes end and we begin the exam period, the Law Library has restricted access from April 28 through May 14. During restricted access the Law Library is open to law school affiliates, university faculty, and non-law students conducting legal research.  The Law Library continues to be sensitive to the needs of the university community during exams, and non-law students who need to retrieve books or obtain research assistance are welcome to visit the library for those purposes.

Good luck on exams one and all!

 

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