The Law Library invites 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs to submit scholarly research papers to be considered for the annual Cornell Law Library Robert Cantwell Prize for Exemplary Student Research.prizelogo

Entries may include, but are not limited to, papers written for a class or journal notes.  All papers must have been written in the time period spanning May, 2013 – May, 2014.  Work product generated through summer or other employment will not be accepted.  Papers must be a minimum of 10 pages in length, must be written in proper Bluebook format, and must be properly footnoted.

First prize is $500, second prize is $250, and both winners will be invited to publish their papers in Scholarship@Cornell Law, a digital repository of the Cornell Law Library.  For submission procedure and selection criteria, please see here:  http://www.lawschool.cornell.edu/library/WhatWeDo/HelpStudents/PrizeStudentResearch.cfm

Papers will be accepted on an ongoing basis through May 1, 2014.  The winners will be announced May 8, 2014.

 

HOLlogo_fullcolorJust in time to catch the end of Women’s History Month we’re unveiling our latest database from HeinOnline: Women and the Law (Peggy). From the publisher:

“This unique collection of materials provides a platform to research the progression of women’s roles and rights in society over the past 200 years.  Also included are more than 70 titles from Emory University Law School’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project, which provide a platform to view the effect of law and culture on the female gender.”

For more information on what’s included in the collection check the brochure provided in the link above or contact Nina Scholtz (nes78@cornell.edu), Digital Resources Librarian.

eisenberg_2000As the Cornell Law School mourns the death of Professor Theodore Eisenberg, the Law Library is taking a moment to feature his groundbreaking legal scholarship.

A pioneer in the field of empirical legal studies, the uniqueness of his scholarship was equally matched by his productivity, authoring or coauthoring over 125 scholarly articles and writing or contributing to over 20 books. Additionally he founded the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies in 2004, which is consistently regarded as one of the most influential publications in the field.

Many of Professor Eisenberg’s works are currently featured on our Scholarship@Cornell Law repository, where his use of statistical methodology to gain new insights into punitive damages, capital juries and myriad of other diverse topics is on full display and serves as a tribute to the legacy of one of Cornell Law’s true intellectual and creative forces.

The library has recently acquired the EBSCOhost database Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text. The database features close to 500,000 records from the most influential publications in the discipline, including full text for nearly 300 journals and magazines, according to the publisher.

The database may be used by all Cornell students, faculty, and staff both on and off campus with the link given above.

Questions? Contact Nina Scholtz, Digital Resources Librarian, or Law Library Reference.

Today we’re featuring one of the most recent additions to our repository with Professor Charles K. Whitehead’s January 2014 article “Lawyers and Fools: Lawyer-Directors in Public Corporations” appearing in the Georgetown Law Review and co-authored with Lubomir P. Litov and Simone M. Sepe of the University of Arizona.

From the abstract:

The accepted wisdom—that a lawyer who becomes a corporate director has a fool for a client—is outdated. The benefits of lawyer-directors in today’s world significantly outweigh the costs. Beyond monitoring, they help manage litigation and regulation, as well as structure compensation to align CEO and shareholder interests. The results have been an average 9.5% increase in firm value and an almost doubling in the percentage of public companies with lawyer-directors.

This Article is the first to analyze the rise of lawyer-directors. It makes a variety of other empirical contributions, each of which is statistically significant and large in magnitude. First, it explains why the number of lawyer-directors has increased. Among other reasons, businesses subject to greater litigation and regulation as well as firms with significant intangible assets, such as patents, value a lawyer-director’s expertise. Second, this Article describes the impact of lawyer-directors on corporate monitoring. Among other results, it shows that lawyer-directors are more likely to favor a board structure and takeover defenses that potentially reduce shareholder value—balanced, however, by the benefits of lawyer-directors, such as the valuable advice they can provide. Finally, this Article analyzes the significant reduction in risk-taking and the increase in firm value that results from having a lawyer on the board.

Our findings fly in the face of requirements that focus on director independence. Our results show that board composition—and the training, skills, and experience that directors bring to managing a business—can be at least as valuable to the firm and its shareholders.

For more on the latest scholarly articles from Professor Whitehead and the rest of the law school faculty visit the repository at Scholarship@Cornell Law.

Would you like to enhance your resume?  The Law Library Research Fellow Program has an opening for a second or third-year Cornell Law student.  Fellows conduct research for faculty who do not have their own research assistant, or who need additional help with a project.  Research Fellow’s hours are flexible, and they have the same pay rate as other Law School faculty RAs.  To apply, send your resume to Matt Morrison, mmm72@cornell.edu.

The end of one year and the begenning of a new one always seems to bring with it a trove of lists taking stock of the best and worst of the previous year. Never one to miss an opportunity to list things, we thought we’d highlight one of our own featuring the top ten most downloaded papers in the history of the Scholarship@Cornell Law Repository. Some on the list are more recent publications, while one others have been around for a decade or more.

Top Ten Downloads:

African Customary Law, Customs, and Women’s Rights
Muna Ndulo

Basic Indian Legal Literature for Foreign Legal Professionals
Uma Narayan

Overview of Legal Systems in the Asia-Pacific Region: India
Navoneel Dayanand

Overview of Legal Systems in the Asia-Pacific Region: South Korea
Oh Seung Jin

Legal Education in China: English Language Materials
Roderick O’Brien

Legalization of Prostitution in Thailand: A Challenge to Feminism and Societal Conscience
Virada Somswasdi

A Study of Islamic Family Law in Malaysia: A Select Bibliography
Raihana Abdullah

Introduction to the Italian Legal System. The Allocation of Normative Powers: Issues In Law Finding
Marinella Baschiera

Larger Board Size and Decreasing Firm Value in Small Firms
Theodore Eisenberg, Stefan Sundgren, and Martin T. Wells

Legal Treatment of Cohabitation in the United States
Cynthia Grant Bowman

 

homeHeaderLogoImage_en_USThe Journal of Open Access to Law is making its official debut this week. The journal describes itself as “an open-access, peer-reviewed academic journal of international scope. Its purpose is to promote international research on the topic of open access to law.”

The inaugural issue features articles discussing “the governance of new models of legal publishing, projects in open access to law, technical challenges and economic opportunities created by open access to law as well as trends and changes suggested by the globalization of access.”

For a more detailed description of the journal and its aims head over to Legal Information Institute Director and journal co-editor Tom Bruce’s blog B-Screeds.

consultationWhether you are working on a looming project or paper, or simply want to get a jump on developing the skills you might need for summer employment, research consultations are a great way to get prepared.

Get advice tailored to your research needs on:

  • Advanced research skills and strategies.
  • Jurisdictional sources.
  • Key resources in substantive practice areas.
  • And more!

Appointment forms are available at the circulation desk.

The Cornell E-Rulemaking Initiative (CeRI) has been exploring technological innovation as a supplement to formal Notice and Comment rulemaking provided by the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations.  Attorneys and professional associations frequently submit lengthy comments regarding important proposed rules but advocates for open government worry that participation by affected individuals is lacking.

A recent CeRI article by Cynthia R. Farina, Dmitry Epstein, Josiah Heidt, and Mary J. Newhart summarizes some of the CeRI findings: “Regulation Room: Getting ‘More, Better’ Civic Participation in Complex Government Policymaking.” CeRi’s ‘Regulation Room’ supported online participation for 5 proposed federal rules & then evaluated the impact in their recent paper.  The rules governed texting while driving, Electronic Onboard Recorders in trucks, airline passenger rights, airline kiosk and website accessibility, and consumer protections for home financing.  In addition to providing an opportunity to comment on particular sections of the proposals, CeRi members advertised the regulations on social media and then moderated comments by asking for more detailed information. The paper analyzed the effectiveness of the Regulation Room initiative by looking at the summary of the comments in the final rules as well as the type of comments forwarded to the agency.  Without the Regulation Room support, there is a participation literacy barrier: many members of the public don’t have the ability or inclination to devote a significant amount of time reading through lengthy proposed regulations, even if the proposal has a direct impact.

For more on the latest scholarly articles from CeRI and the rest of the law school faculty visit the repository at Scholarship@Cornell Law.

© 2014 InfoBrief Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha