Throughout the year, Research Librarians provide customized sessions with individual students to prepare for their summer jobs, clerkships, public interest work, and post-graduate positions. These consultations become even more valuable as you prepare for summer employment. Tailored advice includes, but is not limited to, specific jurisdictional sources, key resources in substantive practice areas, and advanced research skills and strategies. Consultations can be as short as 15 minutes or last up to 60 minutes. Our registration form allows you to specify your interests and needs, and request a particular Research Librarian if desired. Forms are available at the Circulation Desk in the Reading Room and here.

Bloomberg:  Your academic account remains active during the summer and there are no restrictions on its use.  It can be used for both academic and commercial purposes.  For graduates, your BLAW account remains active through December 2012.

 

Lexis:  You will have full access to Lexis Advance during the summer without special registration.  If you do not have a Lexis Advance account, contact our Lexis rep, Aaron Eberle, aaron.eberle@lexisnexis.com Academic use only, commercial use is prohibited.

Academic use includes:

  • Summer course preparation and assignments
  • Journal and Moot Court research
  • Research associated with pursuing a grant or scholarship
  • Working as a faculty research assistant
  • An internship, externship, or clinic position for school credit or graduation requirement
  • Bar exam preparation
  • Research skill improvement

For summer access to Lexis.com, you will need to register at www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool/ at which a registration form will be available by the end of April.  Register before the end of May.  Same restrictions on academic use apply as above.

 

Westlaw:  You will have full access to both Westlaw.com and Westlaw Next for the summer without special registration.  NOTE: West is placing a per month limit on the use of each; however, the hour limit is significantly higher than the maximum number of hours used by any student during the school year.  If you exceed the limitation, you will be able to register for additional hours at https://lawschool.westlaw.com Academic use only, commercial use is prohibited.

Academic use includes:

  • Law school coursework
  • Journal or Moot Court research
  • Working as a faculty research assistant
  • Unpaid, non-profit public interest positions, excluding government and court positions
  • Pro bono work for academic credit
  • Bar exam preparation

If you have questions, contact Matt Morrison.

The Cornell Law Library invites 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs to submit scholarly research papers to be considered for the Cornell Law Library Prize for Exemplary Student Research.  All papers must have been written in the time period spanning June, 2011 – May, 2012.  Entries may include, but are not limited to, papers written for a class or journal notes.  Work product generated through summer or other employment will not be accepted.  Papers must be a minimum of 10 pages in length, must be written in proper Bluebook format, and must be properly footnoted.  First prize is $500, second prize is $250, and both winners will be invited to publish their papers in Scholarship@Cornell Law, a digital repository of the Cornell Law Library.  For submission procedure and selection criteria, please visit the Law Library website.  Submissions will be accepted on an ongoing basis through May 2, 2012.

Need to stay up-to-date with news and events in China?  The Law Library has a new electronic subscription called Current Digest of the Chinese Press.  This is an excellent resource, especially for those who do not read Chinese, because it offers an unabridged and unfiltered English translation.  The product is published by East View Press, and it offers a comprehensive view of China through relevant and timely stories.  The Digest is a weekly that culls articles from a broad range of sources all aimed at a domestic audience.  These articles are then carefully translated so as not to lose the actual sense and meaning of the original article.  So, if you need reliable Chinese news, be sure to check out the Current Digest.

This semester, there will be no Saturday reference. Instead, we are starting Sunday reference hours from 1 pm-6 pm. Two new part-time reference librarians will be on duty to answer questions and help with your research needs. Here is information about the new librarians:

Greg Ewing is the Assistant Director for Faculty & Outreach Services at the Barclay Law Library, Syracuse University College of Law. Prior to coming to Syracuse University in 2000, Greg spent a dozen years working in court and law firm libraries. Greg earned his B.A. in Latin from Carleton College, a Masters in Library Science from the U. of Maryland, and a J.D. from the Syracuse University College of Law. Greg is admitted to practice in New York State.

Emily Love received her B.A. and Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University. Emily has worked at the CNN political research library in Washington D.C., Concordia University in Montreal and was most recently an outreach librarian at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. At CNN, she conducted research on federal government web pages and on the 2005 nomination process of the new Supreme Court Chief Justice. At Illinois, Emily provided outreach and user education programs across campus.

The Cornell Law Library invites 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs to submit scholarly research papers to be considered for the Cornell Law Library Prize for Exemplary Student Research. All papers must have been written in the time period spanning June, 2011 – May, 2012. Entries may include, but are not limited to, papers written for a class or journal notes. Work product generated through summer or other employment will not be accepted. Papers must be a minimum of 10 pages in length, must be written in proper Bluebook format, and must be properly footnoted. First prize is $500, second prize is $250, and both winners will be invited to publish their papers in Scholarship@Cornell Law, a digital repository of the Cornell Law Library. For submission procedure and selection criteria, please visit the Law Library website. Submissions will be accepted on an ongoing basis through May 2, 2012.

October is Information Literacy Awareness Month! Cornell students are warmly invited to show off your sleuthing skills for a chance to win a $25 iTunes gift card. The contest is open to all students. Check out Facebook for a CLUE that will help you answer the question below!
Rulloff’s Restaurant in Collegetown is named after an infamous 19th century Ithaca resident, Edward Rulloff, who was convicted and hanged for murder in 1871. Was he guilty or innocent?
• Find credible historical evidence to prove or disprove the 19th-century crimes of which Rulloff was accused.
• Provide a 150-word synopsis of your findings, with one credible citation to verify your research, and enter to win a chance at a $25 iTunes gift card.
• (Hint: The back of the restaurant menu does not qualify as a credible source.)

Make your submission at trickortruth by November 7th to be entered in the iTunes gift card drawing.
Good luck—and Happy Halloween!

Electronic filing of court papers with public access to many of the documents is now the standard for federal courts through PACER. And now New York State Courts have an e-Filing System, NYSCEF. NYSCEF permits the filing of legal papers by electronic means with the County Clerk and the courts in certain case types in designated venues, as well as electronic service of papers in those cases. Tompkins County is not yet one of the venues; click here for the list of current counties eligible.

For free public access, any individual can search via the “search as guest” function on the Log In screen; no NYSCEF account is required. However, the judge can order the county clerk to seal particular documents or the entire case. “Sensitive” documents can be viewed by attorneys consented in that particular case and by the public at the county clerk computer.

A demonstration video designed to familiarize filers with its functionality is available here. How to get to the Courthouse is no longer the first problem new lawyers have to deal with. NYSCEF and PACER on the web take you there virtually!

The Law Library now has chat reference. We can chat with you between 9 and 5 on weekdays and from 1 to 5 on Saturday, the same hours that we have reference service. So now you can ask your research questions in person at the desk, by phone, by email and by chat reference. We are using a chat program called Chatroll which is very easy to use. You can find the chat box on our web site here. You will be asked to click a sign-in button and will be given a guest number; then you will be able to ask your question. Remember that many questions require in-depth answers and research advice and are better handled in person at the desk. You might be asked to come to the reference desk if you ask for detailed help with a research project. Otherwise, we are ready to respond to your chat questions, so ask away!

This week you received a Bloomberg Law password via email. What is Bloomberg Law? It is a database that allows you to search for primary law, as well as news and company information. One of the major benefits from using B-Law is that you can keep your password and continue to use it over the summer. Our Bloomberg Law rep is Pamela Haahr. She will be here on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 5th and 6th, to distribute information and answer your questions about this service. She will be set up at the table outside the Reading Room (in the 3rd floor stacks area) from 10am to 5pm. Feel free to stop by and get a short demo of this alternative to Lexis and Westlaw.

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