Jean Pajerek

Jean Pajerek

Jean Pajerek, the Law Library's Associate Director for Information Management, is one of the presenters of "Launching into RDA: The New Frontier" at the American Association of Law Libraries conference this weekend.  Jean also prepared "FRBR Meets RDA," training materials explaining the relationships between the new cataloging standard, Resource Description and Access, and Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records.  "FRBR Meets RDA" has been nationally recognized as among the best freely available RDA training materials by the Library of Congress Program for Cooperative Cataloging's RDA Training Materials Task Force.  The Task Force's report recommending Jean's materials is available at the Library of Congress's Catalogers Learning Workshop.

At the conference in Boston on Sunday, July 22, at 3:45 p.m., Jean and her co-presenter, Patricia Sayre McCoy of the University of Chicago's D'Angelo Law Library, will describe the Cornell Law Library's and the D'Angelo Law Library's experiences transitioning to the new standard ahead of three national U.S. libraries.  Jean and Pat's presentation about RDA at last year's conference is available on YouTube.

Looking for some lighter reading this summer?  The Law Library’s Popular Reading collection is available on reserve at the Circulation Desk.  In addition, the library stacks hold a variety of novels and short stories for those interested in lawyers, courtrooms, and the law.  Here are a few for you to consider: 

If you want something in the vein of Grisham and Turow, consider Milton Hirsch’s The Shadow of Justice. Hirsch, a former prosecutor and current defense attorney, tells the story of a trial for cocaine possession in a Miami courthouse.  The book was the ABA’s first venture into the field of mystery publishing.   Another courtroom drama is played out in Alan Dershowitz’s first venture into fiction, The Advocate’s Devil.  Fast-paced and entertaining, this celebrity trial novel follows a defense lawyer’s efforts to acquit a famous and charismatic basketball player on rape charges in the face of his increasing suspicion the basketball star is guilty.

Kermit Roosevelt’s In the Shadow of the Law turns from the courtroom to law firm life.  Roosevelt (who left the practice of law to become a law professor) is set in Washington, D.C. biglaw.  While its plot tracks the resolution of two cases – a murder and a chemical plant explosion – the novel also delves into the inner lives of the firm’s partners and associates.

 

 

 

The short story collection When Tutt Meets Tutt features Ephraim Tutt, a long-running Saturday Evening Post character invented by Arthur Train.  The title story of this 1927 collection tells the humorous story of a will contest fought by attorneys whose partnership has temporarily broken up.

If you prefer British courtrooms, step back a few decades into the world of Henry Cecil, one of the most amusing novelists about the British legal system.  Typical of Cecil’s style is the Roger Thursby trilogy.  In Brothers in Law, Thursby, a newly qualified young barrister, makes his debut in the Old Bailey defending a con artist.  Thursby, now a 12-year veteran of the bar, defends a case of police bribery in Friends at Court.  Finally, ten or so years later, Sober as a Judge advances Thursby to the rank of high court judge.  Also set in British courtrooms, but in the murder mystery genre, is Tragedy at Law by Cyril Hare, in which Mr. Justice Barber – a very nasty judge indeed -- travels the circuit in World War II England on his way to being murdered.

Trial and Error: An Oxford Anthology of Legal Stories includes excerpts from novels such Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird and Anthony Trollope’s Lady Anna.  Also included are short stories, for example Philip Roth’s “Eli, the Fanatic.”  Still more legal stories are found in Best Legal Stories and Best Legal Stories 2, both edited by John Welcome.

Finally, if you’re interested in pursuing more courtroom fiction, Jon L. Breen’s bibliography Novel Verdicts: A Guide to Courtroom Fiction provides descriptions of over 400 novels and short story collections published before 1984.

Throughout the year, Research Librarians provide customized sessions with individual students to prepare for their summer jobs, clerkships, public interest work, and post-graduate positions. These consultations become even more valuable as you prepare for summer employment. Tailored advice includes, but is not limited to, specific jurisdictional sources, key resources in substantive practice areas, and advanced research skills and strategies. Consultations can be as short as 15 minutes or last up to 60 minutes. Our registration form allows you to specify your interests and needs, and request a particular Research Librarian if desired. Forms are available at the Circulation Desk in the Reading Room and here.

As classes end and we begin the exam period, the Law Library has restricted access from April 28 through May 14. During restricted access the Law Library is open to law school affiliates, university faculty, and non-law students conducting legal research.  The Law Library continues to be sensitive to the needs of the university community during exams, and non-law students who need to retrieve books or obtain research assistance are welcome to visit the library for those purposes.

Good luck on exams one and all!

 

On Wednesday, April 25, 2012, the Law Library will host Cornell Companions, a pet visitation program sponsored by the Cornell University veterinary community.  From 11:00am to 1:00pm, six dogs and two llamas will be available to law students in the Law School Courtyard (or foyer in the event of rain).  Interested students are invited to sign up for this event at the Circulation Desk in the Library.  Up to 25 students may attend each twenty-minute session.  The animals are vaccinated, free of parasites, trained in obedience, and screened for the proper temperament.  Enjoy this opportunity to relax before finals in the therapeutic companionship of an affectionate pet!   Please let us know if you have any questions or comments by emailing the Law Library at lawlib.admin@cornell.edu

Dear Students:

Be sure to check out the new scanner (next to the printer) in the reading room during your next trip to the library. Please try it out and let us know what you think.

Features of the BookEdge Plus KIC Scanner

KIC BookEdge Plus embodies state-of-the-art walk-up scanning solutions for students and faculty.  Using a touch screen, scan in black and white or color and at resolutions up to 600dpi and output to a variety of formats including searchable PDF, JPEG, TIFF, PNG, even MP3 audio files.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Scan/copy up to 24x17 inch bound or unbound material at twice the speed of a high-speed copier
  • Create full color electronic images and/or paper copies with a single touch
  • Review large electronic images at nearly full-size before printing copies
  • Electronically collate and print copies
  • C r e a t e searchable PDF, JPEG, TIFF, PNG and editable text files
  • Create audio files from text for MP3 players, including iPods
  • Create, collate, and print reports with title pages and style templates
  • Go ‘green’. Promote minimal use of paper and ink

KIC has many ways to store, send and print information.

  • USB drive
  • E-mail, FTP
  • PDF and searchable PDF
  • Audio Podcast
  • Local or Network Printer

All the best,

Library Staff

Dear Students:

To better accommodate your needs, and currently a pilot program, there is a new designated space in the library for eating.  Students are welcome to bring food to the tables located by the third floor copy room at any time of the day.  Please be considerate of other library users and housekeeping staff and clean up after yourself in order to maintain a pleasant environment for all.  Receptacles are provided for waste and recyclables. 

The no-food rule remains in effect for the remainder of the library, including the Reading Room, stacks, and carrel areas.   Drinks in covered containers are allowed throughout the library.

We appreciate your assistance in keeping the library clean and pest-free.  Please let us know if you have any questions or concerns.

Dear Students,

We are in the process of planning library services for the next school year, and would really appreciate your feedback on how we are currently performing.  To collect your feedback, we have a brief survey for you.  To access the survey, see the e-mail sent to you from Law Library Director, Femi Cadmus on Feb. 1, which contains a link.

As a token of thanks, we will enter the names of all who complete the survey into a drawing for an iPad 2.  The survey will be available through Monday, February 13.

Many thanks,

The Law Library

 

 

This semester, there will be no Saturday reference. Instead, we are starting Sunday reference hours from 1 pm-6 pm. Two new part-time reference librarians will be on duty to answer questions and help with your research needs. Here is information about the new librarians:

Greg Ewing is the Assistant Director for Faculty & Outreach Services at the Barclay Law Library, Syracuse University College of Law. Prior to coming to Syracuse University in 2000, Greg spent a dozen years working in court and law firm libraries. Greg earned his B.A. in Latin from Carleton College, a Masters in Library Science from the U. of Maryland, and a J.D. from the Syracuse University College of Law. Greg is admitted to practice in New York State.

Emily Love received her B.A. and Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University. Emily has worked at the CNN political research library in Washington D.C., Concordia University in Montreal and was most recently an outreach librarian at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. At CNN, she conducted research on federal government web pages and on the 2005 nomination process of the new Supreme Court Chief Justice. At Illinois, Emily provided outreach and user education programs across campus.

Did you know you can borrow more than books from the Law Library?  We have items to help further your work or take a break from it:

  • 2 Laptops with wireless Internet access and the full Microsoft Office Suite
  • 1 Flashdrive
  • 5 Digital Voice Recorders (written permission from professor required)
  • Several Earphones/Ear Buds
  • 1 Calculator
  • 10 Umbrellas
  • 1 Soccer Ball with Goal
  • 1 Frisbee
  • 1 Football
  • Scrabble
  • Chess/Checkers

Coming soon:

  • 2 iPads
  • 1 Kindle
  • 1 Digital Flip Camera
  • 1 Portable DVD Player
  • 2 Computer Mice

All items are available at the circulation desk in the Reading Room.

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